Entries in the 'Torah' Category

The Meaning Of Kabbalistic Books, Part 2

laitman_262The Torah Is a Secret Code.

From the point of view of Kabbalah, the Torah is a completely secret code. Moreover, it is classified such that each person can understand it in one way or another depending on the extent of his correction or corruption.

Question: The secret is not in that I have to understand the meaning of some word?

Answer: No. You cannot extort its code from someone, open this book with a special key, or see what is hidden between the pages. It is impossible.

But if you have a certain quality—bestowal, love, exiting yourself, i.e., the quality of the upper world—then while reading the Torah, you begin to see that the book describes not our world, but a completely different, reverse upper world.

If a person can acquire such qualities that are contrary to one’s current properties, then one reads this book correctly, as it was written by its author. And if one does not possess these qualities, then one reads it like everybody else in this world.

Question: I have heard that if one picks a letter after every ten words while reading the Torah, it is possible to reveal some information in this way.

Answer: No. You can read it as you like: front to back, back to front, after every ten or twenty words—nothing will help.

Question: Can the future be predicted by this book? They say that it contains all the information.

Answer: It contains information about everything. Not only about our world, but about all the worlds, about everything that exists, about each and every one of us and all of us together, regardless of time and any possible states. But the fact is that this cannot be revealed.

Question: Is it really possible to find information about a person who will be born, suppose, in 20 years, and about what will happen to him in 50 years?

Answer: To the smallest detail. Moreover, all his external and internal properties are described there, everything that will happen to him every moment, with all the billions of people, animals, and plants, every grain of sand, all the worlds, and their mutual representations.

Question: Can Kabbalists decipher this?

Answer: Yes, to the extent of their development. They read it in the same way as we read a plain text.
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From KabTV’s “Fundamentals of Kabbalah” 12/18/18

The Meaning Of Kabbalistic Books, Part 1

laitman_531.01The Many Faces of the Torah

Question: When we open the Torah, we find a collection of historical stories with many characters. How should we correctly relate to them?

Answer: If the Torah did not come from a special source but was an ordinary book written, suppose by a person in the Middle Ages, then it would just be an interesting historical novel.

The Torah itself is presented in very interesting language, and when you start reading it, you cannot stop, because it captivates you. There is something in it that makes you never get tired of reading it.

I speak of this as an ordinary reader who has nothing to do with the origin of this book, religion, history, geography, or with anything else. It is just written in an interesting style.

Some perceive the Torah as a historical document, others as fiction, or, perhaps, as a collection of instructions or legal documents. It contains a lot of information about the interaction of people and nations in ancient times, about their view of the world.

In general, the Torah is a very interesting book. We see something similar in Josephus Flavius, if it is possible to compare the Torah and his works at all. To some extent, he retells the Torah and describes it as a historian.

Josephus is a truly stunning historian with a broad outlook and a deep knowledge of historical facts. He wrote his works while in exile in Rome where a huge institute was created especially for him, where hundreds of people worked for him.

But all the same, what he wrote cannot be compared with the Torah itself.
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From KabTV’s “Fundamentals of Kabbalah” 12/18/18

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“Shavuot: Brightening Israel And The Jewish People” (The Times Of Israel)

The Times of Israel published my new article “Shavuot: Brightening Israel and the Jewish People

“Israel is all messed up with their election… They ought to get their act together,” said President Trump in relation to the political uncertainty in this country going to the polls for a second time this year. He is right, but it’s just a symptom of the wider problem of the deeply fragmented Israeli society that lacks a common vision about its future, a state of division also existent within American Jewry, as well as between Israel and the Diaspora. The timing of Shavuot and all it represents could not be more relevant. The holiday symbolizes the reception of the guidebook for the spiritual correction of our people, the receiving of the Torah, or in other words, the way out of the mess.

What was actually given to us at Mount Sinai? The Torah is not a chronicle about past events. On the contrary, it describes the seminal moment when our future becomes decided, when a clear answer becomes required from all of us: Are we ready to accept mutual guarantee (Arvut) as the law of life? Exactly this is the Torah—instruction on how to correct our shattered relations and instead become guarantors for each other by loving our neighbors as ourselves.

This is precisely the goal for which the Torah was given to us. However, we must constantly renew our state of worthiness for reception of the Torah by scaling the “mountain of hatred” (Sinah), the roar of the storm raging inside us. To do this, we must unite, connect with each other, become “as one man with one heart” and stand at the foot of the mountain. In other words, we must fully comprehend that we are given very important and strict conditions under which we must work with all diligence and ever-increasing unity.

Shavuot, like all Jewish holidays, carries a call to action. The holiday is bright. It’s full of whiteness and light, but the call to action is quite complicated to carry out. We bump into each other; people are strangled by indifference, burned with anger toward those with different opinions than their own. We are in a desert of barren and soulless relationships. If we would suddenly recognize how egoism tears us to pieces, if we would try to connect into one integral body and face our seemingly insurmountable internal split, we would then clearly realize how desperately we need help.

This state of clarity we presently face is a unique opportunity for unity. Only by increasing our connection will we be able to climb the mountain ever higher, rising above our separation. To rise means to continually increase our connection above all problems, difficulties and disturbances that we encounter in order to help us overcome more and more and to create a vessel in which the light of the Torah will gradually be revealed.

In this moment of recognition coinciding with the Shavuot holiday, we have the opportunity to receive help and instruction, a unifying force that can increase our social health and let us live happily. This is the current moment of evolutionary development we find ourselves in: either we will grow up proactively and start using the Torah according to its purpose, for the sake of unity above all disagreements, or the hard knocks of life will force us to grow up.

The Torah, indeed, is the most powerful tool that we have yet to learn how to use. A person cannot use this tool alone. The problem, however, is that we still cannot work together to put it to use. The Torah will provide us with security and prosperity and will give peace to the world, but first we must get used to the fact that it works between us and not on the individual. Egoism, after all, is revealed in relation to other people.

Therefore, the Torah is meant to connect the person with the environment at any time and level of human development. It reveals to us the force of goodness and love that ties us together. We begin to sense how we must balance our egoism, the evil inclination, wherever it is revealed with the force of goodness, and we can then hold two forces like reins by which we can advance directly to unity and love, letting us lay a solid and bright foundation of our future.

For more about Shavuot >>>>>>>>>>>>>>
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Why Is The Day Of Translating The Torah Considered A Day Of Mourning?

Laitman_137Question: Why is the 10th day of the month of Tevet, the day of the translation of the Torah from Hebrew into 70 languages, considered a day of mourning? Allegedly, on this day, the Torah was removed from its place. What does it mean?

Answer: It’s because this translation deprived the Torah of its true spiritual foundation, of its true form, only a superficial translation remains. Even purely didactically it could not be exact, not to mention the fact that the spiritual part cannot be translated into any language.

Even Hebrew is not a language but a code—letters that follow each other in a certain sequence, according to certain rules. They cannot be rearranged. In each word, there is a certain root of two or three letters, the so-called “Binyan” (structure).

And when Hebrew is translated, all this is discarded and practically nothing remains of the language. One takes a simple translation of a word, a property from our world, although it does not say anything about material things at all, and gives it some kind of copy of our world.

Question: How many discussions exist around the fact that a woman was allegedly created from man’s rib, or that the horns of Moses were shining? All this because of an incorrect translation?

Answer: You cannot do anything. This is problem.

Question: Will humanity, by ascending back to the spiritual world, return the Torah to its place?

Answer: We have nothing to return! The Torah did not fall, did not break, and nothing happened to it.

The Torah is a portrayal of the device of the upper world. A person who starts to engage in it and rise, comprehends this device.

But when he thinks that this device is already in his pocket in the form of a book, not even written in Hebrew, but in a translation that does not have spiritual meaning, then he perceives the Torah as mere stories. When he reads that in the beginning God created the heaven and the earth, he thinks: “I know what heaven is. I know what Earth is. Let’s keep reading.”

Therefore, a person who does not want to “dissect” himself must not be allowed into the spiritual world.
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From the Kabbalah Lesson in Russian 1/6/19

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Torah And Vowels

Laitman_507.05Question: Vowels are used in Hebrew: nekudot—dots above the letters that indicate the correct pronunciation of the vowels. There is an account that they were developed by a family from Tiberias after the destruction of the Temple in order to preserve the sound of the Torah. But we study that the vowel vocalizations are the lights that are above the letter, i.e., above the Kli (vessel) or under the Kli.

Were the nekudot invented by the Tiberias family to record the Torah? After all, the Torah itself was written without nekudot.

Answer: It does not matter. In the Torah, there are really not very many signs necessary for its reading. After all, when you read the Torah, you must reproduce it with all your external and internal instruments.

That is, I must know how I sing the text, how I give intonation to each sentence, where I can pause, and where it is forbidden. After all, a person cannot read the text in one breath.

Moreover, the reading of the Torah is different from usual reading when you take air into the lungs, read something out loud, and release the air. When reading the Torah, I must properly manage my lungs like an organ in a cathedral. I press on certain parts of my lungs, which consist of five parts. After that, I turn on the five parts of the reproduction apparatus: the larynx, throat, mouth, lips, and teeth.

Therefore, Hebrew letters are a shortened form of the huge, powerful data that a person received in order to read.
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From the Kabbalah Lesson in Russian 1/6/19

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Atonement For Sins From The Kabbalistic Point Of View

Laitman_115Question: Is there a concept of “atonement for sins” in Kabbalah? Who is to blame if the Creator controls everything and a person is completely under His management? Who can determine the length of the person’s stay in the cities of banishment for a crime?

Answer: The thing is that everything written in the Torah, The Book of Zohar and other Kabbalistic books speaks only about the upper world.

When I studied with Rabash, I would recite a passage from the Babylonian Talmud to him and he would explain what the people who wrote it meant from a spiritual perspective. It was very interesting because everything seemed completely different: they wrote in the language of the branches of our world while implying the upper roots.

For example, people who committed crimes were sent to the cities of asylum for six years. Although our world is seemingly separate from the spiritual world, the six years represent the six Sefirot of HGT NHY, which a person has to go through in order to advance from Malchut to Bina in the seventh year, and those six years are reflected in our world.

Although these are not the years of the corporeal world; nevertheless, a person has to be isolated for these six years while he works on himself, advancing through the six degrees of the spiritual world. This is called the “correction.”
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From the Kabbalah Lesson in Russian 8/19/18

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Secrets Of The Torah

525Question: I often listen to the Secrets of the Eternal Book TV program where you explain what each commandment means, and I try to understand how Kabbalists pass on this information.

Why didn’t they put an explanation of every concept in parentheses? For example, Egypt (Mitzraim) is a concentration of evil, Pharaoh is the ego, and so on.

Answer: There is a purpose for this—it gives a person freedom. As one develops, he can smoothly interpret all spiritual work either within our world or within the spiritual world in accordance with his growth.

I also asked myself these questions, and tried to put it all out in my first books, at least in a very simple way. But there is no language in the world that can simply describe spiritual actions and everything that is written in the Torah.
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From the Kabbalah Lesson in Russian 4/1/18

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What Is The Difference Between The Revealed And The Concealed Torah?

laitman_527.07Question: What is the difference between the revealed and the concealed parts of the Torah?

Answer: The concealed part of the Torah is the part that is revealed to a person when he works on his spiritual development. The Torah is completely opposite from what people think.

Question: So, is it always revealed and it only depends on us if it is concealed or revealed to us?

Answer: The Torah is the control system of the entire system of creation. It is concealed with respect to a person individually. However, to the extent in which we are able to participate in this system intelligently and productively, it is gradually revealed to us.

Question: But how is the Torah, as a system of the world’s control, connected to the book that was written 3,000 years ago? Is it the written Torah and the oral Torah?

Answer: They both describe the system we need to enter, learn about, and engage with.

Question: What is the oral Torah? It seems that there are some laws that were possible to describe on a piece of paper and there are laws that could only be passed down by word of mouth?

Answer: The oral Torah is a system of laws that was passed down from teacher to student: from Adam through 20 generations to Abraham and then through all the rest of the generations to Rabbi Shimon, the author of The Book of Zohar. Then it all became hidden. The knowledge about the world, about the individual’s work in drawing closer to the Creator is called “the Torah,” from the word “Ohr” (Light). This knowledge was gradually passed down through a small group of people in each generation. Only now, beginning with the Ari (17th century) and onward, everything began to be reborn.
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From the Kabbalah Lesson in Russian, 3/18/18

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What Is The Torah?

Laitman_633.4Question: What is the Torah?

Answer: The Torah is the upper light that descends upon a person in the amount to which he aspires to bestow and love his neighbor.

Question: Then what is the book of the Torah?

Answer: The book is written in a special language describing the spiritual steps that a person has to go through in order to correct himself to become similar to the upper world.
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From the Kabbalah lesson in Russian, 3/18/18

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Did The Characters Of The Torah Exist?

laitman_527.04Question: Did the prophet Bilam, who was equal to Moses, ever exist physically or were they both historical representations of spiritual forces?

Answer: The Torah speaks only about person’s spiritual path, about his spiritual elevation. Bilam is a great negative force, the opposite side of Moses. In order to reach the degree called Moses, first we will have to be at the opposite degree called Bilam.

It is necessary for us, like Moses; one cannot exist without the other. Similarly, Pharaoh is the opposite side of the Creator, equal to him in strength, but negative, not positive.

Question: So did Rabbi Shimon, the author of The Book of Zohar, exist both physically as a historical figure, and as a spiritual degree, but Bilam and Moses were not historical characters?

Answer: All characters of the Torah existed physically, but each of them played his spiritual role. Therefore, each of them personified a quality opposite to the one opposite to him. For example, Bilam personified the quality opposite to Moses.

In principle, the spiritual root must always touch its earthy branch once, embodied in matter. However, Kabbalah deals exclusively with roots. What do we care about historical characters? We are interested in ascending the spiritual ladder and going through all the states called Bilam, Moses, and so on.
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From the Kabbalah Lesson in Russian 1/14/18

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