Entries in the 'Anti-Semitism' Category

“The Future Of Europe And The Jews” (Times of Israel)

The Times of Israel published my new article “The future of Europe and the Jews

November marks the memory of two major events in European history that still resonate in today’s continent: Kristallnacht, the beginning of the systematic persecution of Jews that culminated with the Holocaust; and the fall of the Berlin Wall, the beginning of Europe’s reunification process. But how much has the continent advanced toward unity in the last few decades? Is it going backwards? Do Jews feel safer? Amid rising anti-Semitism and sociopolitical challenges in Europe, it is evident that the glass walls of the continent’s security and stability can be broken any time.

The Reappearance of Hatred That Never Vanished

If we forget the atrocities of the past, we constantly get reminders. Jews were murdered, synagogues were torched, thousands of Jewish-owned businesses, homes and schools were plundered by the Nazis on Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass) 81 years ago. This month, right in 2019, the commemoration of the pogroms was marked by a wave of anti-Semitic attacks across Scandinavia attributed to neo-Nazis. More than 80 graves were desecrated at a Jewish cemetery in Denmark, and, stickers resembling yellow stars that Jews were forced to wear during the Holocaust were placed on multiple Jewish sites in Denmark and Sweden, including on the Great Synagogue in Stockholm.

In Germany, hundreds of neo-Nazis marched on the anniversary of the anti-Jewish riots, while a multitude of demostrators against the rally questioned why German officials turn a blind eye to such events promoted by extremists.

Massive immigration, economic challenges, and increasing political and social divisions in Europe are fueling radical movements from the right and from the left. And as we have learned from history, that is fertile ground to hatred against Jews. This is precisely the reason why the current state of affairs should matter to us.

The Berlin’s Wall Fell But the Tower of Babel Stands Strong

A call for European unity was the key message of an article recently published in 26 EU countries by German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, commemorating the fall of the Berlin’s Wall 30 years ago. Conversely, today’s Europe resembles the period of upheaval in ancient Babylon when social division prevailed.

In fact, the downfall of the EU within the next one or two decades is perceived as a possible reality by more than 50% of Europeans, according to a survey conducted by the European Council on Foreign Relations earlier this year.

How Jews Can Contribute to Europe’s Future

Knowing our background is crucial to understanding how the Jewish people can contribute to a prosperous future not only for itself but for Europe and the entire world. The people of Israel was not born as a nation in the common sense of the word but as a group of people who subscribed to an idea, the idea of unity. It was formed by Abraham the Patriarch from representatives of different tribes and cultures, just as today’s Europe.

They were an eclectic amalgamation joined only by the idea that there is one force that governs the universe. They also grasped that this force is one of mercy, love, and unity, and that only this force can connect us above our differences and give us the power to agree to unite “as one man with one heart.”

Humanity is now discovering that separation is leading to a dead end, therefore, it is more aware of the need to achieve the opposite state, the state of unity. The nations of the world instinctively feel that Jews, who once attained connection above internal rifts, have the solution to achieve a harmonious existence.

Since Jews are currently not delivering such example of positive connection through Abraham’s method, the nations of the world manifest their pain and discomfort as growing anti-Semitism.

Our role and our most important contribution to the world, according to Kabbalist Yehuda Ashlag (Baal HaSulam), the most renowned Kabbalist of the 20th Century, is to be a conduit to transfer the goodness of unity to humanity. However, in order for that to happen, we must first implement it on ourselves.

Once we return to a unified state, we will be able to submit to humanity as a whole the method of unity and love among human beings. “And when they do that, it is plain to see that with His work, all envy and hatred will be abolished from humanity” (Baal HaSulam, “The Peace“).

The paramount role of Jews to a promising future for all was also highlighted by Rav Kook, as it is written: “In Israel is the secret to the unity of the world” (Orot HaKodesh).
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What Are Your Thoughts On The Halle, Germany Yom Kippur Shooting? (Quora)

Dr. Michael LaitmanMichael Laitman, On Quora: What are your thoughts on the shooting in the German city of Halle that took place outside of a synagogue on Yom Kippur?

The shooting attack near a synagogue in Halle, Germany was yet another dreadful act of anti-Semitism on the holiest day of the Jewish calendar. However, it could have been much worse if the 27-year-old attacker, who identified with the far-right, had broken the synagogue’s doors and slaughtered the 80 worshipers who were conducting the Yom Kippur prayers.

In a video he shot leading up to the shooting, the attacker denied the Holocaust, denounced feminists and immigrants and stated outright that “the root of all these problems is the Jew.”

Following the attack, there were cries, prayers and warmth given to the victims’ families, but also a clear demand for a significant shift to take place against the anti-Semitism that has rapidly spread worldwide.

For example, upon news of the two people who were shot to death, condemnations came one after another, from German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas tweeting that “shots being fired at a synagogue on Yom Kippur, the festival of reconciliation, hits us in the heart,” and “we must all act against anti-Semitism in our country,” through Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu commenting for a “call on the German authorities to continue taking determined action against anti-Semitism.”

However, other than desperate words, there is an air of helplessness in the face of the growing phenomenon.

Helplessness. Desperation. They sound like very undesirable feelings. But could it be that such sensations are actually a positive outcome of the exponentially rising anti-Semitic crimes and threats?

Perhaps when we are repeatedly stunned by an irrational phenomenon that has haunted our people for generations—one which makes no differentiation between genders, between Yom Kippur and a weekday, and between synagogues in Berlin and Pittsburgh—then maybe this is what will goad us to look into what the Kabbalists have been trying to tell us for generations?

Whether in The Zohar or other Kabbalistic texts, what have the Kabbalists been trying to communicate to the Jewish people? Simply put, if we Jews unite with one another, we invite a positive force dwelling in nature to spread not only among each other, but among all humanity. By awakening nature’s positive, unifying force through our unity, we can bring peace to the world. On the contrary, if divided, where every Jew remains within him- or herself in his or her own prayers, then we provoke the opposite: hatred and conflict. As Kabbalist Rabbi Yitzhak Isaac Haver wrote, “Creation and choice, correction and destruction of the world—all depends on Israel” (Siach Yitzhak. Part 2, Likutim 1).

Hours after the deadly shooting attack, German chancellor Angela Merkel attended a vigil to identify with the victims at a historic synagogue in central Berlin. She stood with the Jewish community as they together sang, “Ose shalom be Meromav” (“make peace in His heaven”). Ironically, sometimes the answer to our toughest questions can be found right under our noses. Sometimes we need only open our ears and listen to the words we’re singing…

  • Ose shalom be Meromav” (“make peace in His heaven”). It means that in our unity and our common prayer, we can make the upper force bring peace above;
  • Hu yaase shalom aleinu” (“He will bring peace upon us”), i.e. the upper force will bring peace to the whole of humanity;
  • Ve al kol Yisrael” (“and upon all of Israel”), i.e. where the role of the people of Israel is to unite;
  • Ve al kol yoshvei tevel” (“and for all the people in the world”), i.e. our role is not to receive the light of unity for ourselves, but to be a conduit for the light to spread to the world, i.e. to be “a light unto the nations.”
  • Ve imru amen” (“and say Amen”), i.e. then we will all—Jews and the nations of the world—be truly grateful for reaching the long-awaited peace.
    Amen.

What If Jews Built a Perfect Society?—Talk with Joshua Goldstein

Joshua Goldstein, Chairman of the US Division of Herut North America, meets with Kabbalist Dr. Michael Laitman to discuss the dream society built by Jews.

How To Address The Urgency For Jews To Unite—Talk With Joshua Goldstein

Joshua Goldstein, Chairman of the US Division of Herut North America, meets with Kabbalist Dr. Michael Laitman to discuss the dream society built by Jews.

What Is The Jews’ Responsibility Toward The World?—Talk With Joshua Goldstein

Joshua Goldstein, Chairman of the US Division of Herut North America, meets with Kabbalist Dr. Michael Laitman to discuss the Jews’ responsibility for building a network of positive connection in the world.

Why Are So Many Jews Not Proud Of Their Identity?—Talk With Joshua Goldstein

Joshua Goldstein, Chairman of the US Division of Herut North America, meets with Kabbalist Dr. Michael Laitman to discuss the origins of anti-Semitism and the essence of being Jewish.

Is The World Crisis The Fault Of Jews? – Talk With Joshua Goldstein

Joshua Goldstein, Chairman of the US Division of Herut North America, meets with Kabbalist Dr. Michael Laitman to discuss the unity of Jews, and awareness of how it influences the world.

Why Is It Necessary For Jews To Unite?

Joshua Goldstein, Chairman of the US Division of Herut North America, meets with Kabbalist Dr. Michael Laitman to discuss the origins of anti-Semitism and its role in directing Jews toward unity.

Can We Overcome Jewish Resistance To Uniting?

Dr. Michael LaitmanFrom My Facebook Page Michael Laitman 10/23

/19

I met with Joshua Goldstein, Chairman of the US Division of Herut North America, to discuss the origins of anti-Semitism and the essence of being Jewish.

The wisdom of Kabbalah states that Jews have a specific role—to reestablish and reveal to all humanity the method of building positive connections between people above the constantly growing human ego, and by this reveal the upper force of love and bestowal.

Why should we believe it? Is there any practical proof that this is what Jews are obliged to do? What if they don’t want to do it?

The laws of nature don’t ask anyone to agree with them. They just exist and function. The states laid out in nature unfold, and according to natural development, today we face a deep and comprehensive crisis of human relations caused by the tremendous growth of the human ego. If it keeps going this way, we’ll destroy ourselves.

Therefore, the only way to deal with the current situation is to implement the method of connection revealed by Abraham to the group of people collected out of 70 nations living in ancient Babylon 3,800 years ago: the Jews. This means that the Jewish people have a specific place in the structure of nature giving them an explicit duty, and if they refuse or fail to perform their role, the whole world will react with extreme pressure and forceful demand for Jews to bring the system to balance.

Therefore, indeed, the role of the Jewish people is that they have to develop a sense of a single unity and drive the whole world toward connection.

“What We Can Learn From The Deadly Attack Outside The Halle Synagogue” (Times Of Israel)

The Times of Israel published my new article “What We Can Learn from the Deadly Attack Outside the Halle Synagogue

The shooting attack near a synagogue in Halle, Germany was yet another dreadful act of anti-Semitism on the holiest day of the Jewish calendar. However, it could have been much worse if the 27-year-old attacker, who identified with the far-right, had broken the synagogue’s doors and slaughtered the 80 worshipers who were conducting the Yom Kippur prayers.

In a video he shot leading up to the shooting, the attacker denied the Holocaust, denounced feminists and immigrants and stated outright that “the root of all these problems is the Jew.”

Upon news of the two people who were shot to death, condemnations came one after another, from German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas tweeting that “shots being fired at a synagogue on Yom Kippur, the festival of reconciliation, hits us in the heart,” and “we must all act against anti-Semitism in our country,” through Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu commenting for a “call on the German authorities to continue taking determined action against anti-Semitism.”

Among all the cries, prayers and warmth for the victims’ families, there is a clear demand for a significant shift to take place against the anti-Semitism that has rapidly spread worldwide. However, other than desperate words, there is an air of helplessness in the face of the growing phenomenon.

Helplessness. Desperation. They sound like very undesirable feelings. But could it be that such sensations are actually a positive outcome of the exponentially rising anti-Semitic crimes and threats?

Perhaps when we are repeatedly stunned by an irrational phenomenon that has haunted our people for generations—one which makes no differentiation between genders, between Yom Kippur and a weekday, and between synagogues in Berlin and Pittsburgh—then maybe this is what will goad us to look into what the Kabbalists have been trying to tell us for generations?

Whether in The Book of Zohar or other Kabbalistic texts, what have the Kabbalists been trying to communicate to the Jewish people? Simply put, if we Jews unite with one another, we invite a positive force dwelling in nature to spread not only among each other, but among all humanity. By awakening nature’s positive, unifying force through our unity, we can bring peace to the world. On the contrary, if divided, where every Jew remains within him- or herself in his or her own prayers, then we provoke the opposite: hatred and conflict. As Kabbalist Rabbi Yitzhak Isaac Haver wrote, “Creation and choice, correction and destruction of the world—all depends on Israel” (Siach Yitzhak. Part 2, Likutim 1).

Hours after the deadly shooting attack, German chancellor Angela Merkel attended a vigil to identify with the victims at a historic synagogue in central Berlin. She stood with the Jewish community as they together sang, “Ose shalom be Meromav” (“make peace in His heaven”). Ironically, sometimes the answer to our toughest questions can be found right under our noses. Sometimes we need only open our ears and listen to the words we’re singing…

  • Ose shalom be Meromav” (“make peace in His heaven”). It means that in our unity and our common prayer, we can make the upper force bring peace above;
  • Hu yaase shalom aleinu” (“He will bring peace upon us”), i.e. the upper force will bring peace to the whole of humanity;
  • Ve al kol Yisrael” (“and upon all of Israel”), i.e. where the role of the people of Israel is to unite;
  • Ve al kol yoshvei tevel” (“and for all the people in the world”), i.e. our role is not to receive the light of unity for ourselves, but to be a conduit for the light to spread to the world, i.e. to be “a light unto the nations.”
  • Ve imru amen” (“and say Amen”), i.e. then we will all—Jews and the nations of the world—be truly grateful for reaching the long-awaited peace.

Amen.
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