We Don’t Hear Each Other

565.02Question: Everyone needs to be able to listen. Parents should listen to their children. Children should listen to their teachers who give them assignments. A manager needs to listen to his subordinates, and so on.

Most people consider themselves very good listeners. I read research that shows only 10% of people have the ability to listen to others. What is the reason? Why do people think they can listen, but we see the opposite?

Answer: Because one plays along with his ego, wants everyone to see how friendly, attentive, and responsive he is. In fact, he wants to listen only to himself, see only himself, and justify only himself. Therefore, it is very difficult for us to communicate with each other well. We cannot hear each other.

Despite the fact that today there are all kinds of methods of video and audio connection, we should check just how connected we are to each other. We have not become any more sociable. We can sit and listen to various programs that supposedly connect us to each other, but we cannot hear or see anyone but ourselves.

Question: There is a basic rule of interpersonal relations that says that the meaning of a message cannot be clearly understood. On a physiological level, we are unable to grasp this message.

In the research I read about, it was established that our audio perception is only 25% effective. Even in informal conversations with friends only 60 to 70% of the information is absorbed.

What is the reason for this gap? There are things that egoism is receptive to.

Answer: It does not matter what the ego is receptive to or not. Since everyone is wrapped up in self-love and wants to feel only themselves, whatever reaches us is still interpreted incorrectly and therefore remains somewhere in the air.
[272619]
From KabTV’s “Communication Skills” 8/14/20

Related Material:
How To Really Listen To Others?
Learn To Listen To Each Other
It Is Better To Do Something Out Of Love Than By Force

Discussion | Share Feedback | Ask a question




Laitman.com Comments RSS Feed